Asset Life Cycle with Maximo for Transportation

This post originally was posted on the  IBM Asset & Facilities Management blog and was written by Vito DeMalteris.

 Asset Life Cycle with Maximo for Transportation

The Asset Life Cycle is an important process to monitor for any industry. All asset owners make some attempt at monitoring this cycle in order to develop enlightened, informed decisions regarding maintenance strategies, spare parts requirements, operational procedures and repair/replace options. The key requirement in making these decisions is knowledge and information. Some of this will come from the manufacturer, some from user experience but the most significant source is from the operating and maintenance history of the specific asset. As you read this document, review the features in theTransportation page.
Maximo for Transportation provides significant detail related to the asset history. The asset application contains information related to that specific asset so that it is made readily available for the user, and in one location in Maximo. Information about warranty coverage, a significant process in the transportation industry, is displayed so that the user will always know what the warranty status is for each asset without having to look for it in the warranty applications.
Advanced Metering capabilities enhance the usage and Preventive Maintenance processes to further the maintenance strategy for your assets. Each asset record has a history option which provides a view into the asset including Work, Preventive and Predictive schedules and history, meter readings history, status change history, condition status history, move history, usage history for motor pool assets, Telematics reading history, activity history, axle position reading history and a chronological history of activities. All of this information is made easily accessible.
Utilizing the Depreciation Schedule provided in the Asset application allows the user to track the monetary value of this asset up to the current date. This information, used in conjunction with the maintenance and meter history of the asset, can be used to help make the repair/replace decision that is inevitable in the transportation environment. 
To help the organization prevent unnecessary work, Maximo for Transportation will display any recent or repeat repairs on the asset whenever a work order against that asset is created. This feature not only helps eliminate duplicate work orders but also helps identify recurring problems which may be an indication of other issues related to the asset, its environment or perhaps training for the technicians performing the work. All of this helps extend the asset service life by pushing valuable information to the user. In summary, Maximo for Transportation provides detailed information concerning the asset to enable the user to extend the asset life cycle and provide the data needed when the time to replace that asset is near. Hear this information for yourself from one of our Transportation clients (Royal Boskalis Westminster). Link to video.

Don’t Go Mobile unless….

pulse14

What’s great about PULSE is it gets you re-energized, gives you a shot of adrenaline, and a kick in the butt to get back out there and fight the good fight. The use case presentations for those of us that have been around Maximo for many years help re-affirm what elements lead to successful and not so successful implementations and for those new to the game provide valuable advice on what rabbit holes to avoid.  Having recently been put in charge of a new Maximo implementation I had to test my temptation of avoiding just that.  One of those rabbit holes is Mobile.  Mobile is the hot topic but be aware that the consumer experience is very different from the enterprise business experience and mobile isn’t the answer when you haven’t clearly identified where you are and where you want to go with your business processes.  You need to pay close attention to what elements lead to a successful implementation before you ever say the word mobile.  I may be preaching to the choir but it bears repeating that the following elements always seem to be at the core of successful implementation experiences:

Partnership between IT and Users – These two groups must work together towards a common goal, but the measurement of success if very different between the two.  IT’s success can be measured in a more objective way in terms of getting the software installed and configured, debugged according to the technical and software performance specifications.  But it is a completely different situation with the users.  They measure success in a very subjective manner and their definition is based more on how they perceive the user experience regardless of how well the software is running and doing what it is supposed to do.    ently been put in charge of a new Maximo implementation I had to test my temptation of avoiding just that.  One of those rabbit holes is Mobile.  Mobile is the hot topic but be aware that the consumer experience is very different from the enterprise business experience and mobile isn’t the answer when you haven’t clearly identified where you are and where you want to go with your business processes.  You need to pay close attention to what elements lead to a successful implementation before you ever say the word mobile.  I may be preaching to the choir but it bears repeating that the following elements always seem to be at the core of successful implementation experiences:

Good Data – The foundation of success is rooted in clean, reliable, accurate, fact based data.  The credibility of your system depends entirely upon the accuracy of your data.  Spend the time it takes to really find out what information you need, why you need it, and who needs it.   Don’t collect data that doesn’t matter.  Remember the more you want the more it cost to get it.  Make sure is serves a useful purpose.

Business Process Analysis – Just as important as good data is the processes of getting that data into and out of the system. This requires really understanding how your operation performs the work, obtains the required information, and how it gets that in front of those that need it.  Assessing these workflows and streamlining these processes is critical in establishing configuration requirements in support of your business.

Managing Expectations – Someone needs to be in charge of defining the dance floor.  Typically this tends to be someone from IT.  This is just the opposite of what should be.  Operations/Users are the ones that have to use it, live with it, work with it, and have to own it. Truly successful implementations are driven by users with realistic expectations and a good technical support team.

To get the most from Maximo there is nothing more important than getting processes defined and streamlined in support of what management has set as the vision and direction for the organization.  Mobile smart devices become the tool of choice when you look to eliminating paper processes and making Maximo “work like we do” to get and deliver the data to those that need it, the way they need it.  High expectations base on our personal “There’s an App for That” experience sets the standard and becomes a challenge when trying to deliver a similar experience with an enterprise business mobile application.  The solution that is “right” can be a bewildering and a hotly contested debate between users and IT.  That is why it is so important that use cases are firmly rooted in well-defined business process requirements established by users.

A few obvious and not so obvious considerations when assessing your mobile solution include:

  • Platform for devices (IOS, Android, Windows Mobile)
  • Device Compatibility – what types of devices can be used on the platform
  • License Structure (named vs concurrent)
  • Online – Offline connectivity
  • Support services
  • User interface – ease of use
  • System Architecture
  • Configurability of applications
  • Skills required to develop applications
  • Administration and deployment of applications
  • Integration needs with other systems besides Maximo
  • Security and BYOD policies
  • Device management and hardware support

Mobile is hot, so be careful that you don’t get burned. Success depends on meeting user expectations.  Get your requirements act together, set realistic user expectations, and —–partner with IT to architect a solution that simplifies the user experience.

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About Randy McDaniel:
Randy has a B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the California State University at Fullerton and has spent over 35 years in the field of maintenance engineering, maintenance planning, capital projects construction, and facilities maintenance. His industry experience includes oil refineries, petrochemical plants, universities, steel mills, assembly plants, lumber mills, and utility plants.

He has spent time as a Maximo senior consultant providing business process re-engineering assessments and managing Maximo implementations. A vocal advocate of Maximo, Randy has been the Chairman of the Southern California Maximo Users Group since 1998 where he often presents best practices, tips and other real life Maximo experiences.

Currently Randy is the Maximo System Administrator and Facilities Management Information Systems Integration Manager at the University of California Los Angeles. He manages the implementation of Maximo and provides IT integration direction and vision for the General Services business unit.

This post originally appeared on the Tivoli User Community boards on March 3, 2014, and is reprinted with permission of the author

 

IBM Maximo Asset Management Help: Integration Framework

Trying to find help for your Maximo system can sometimes be a little daunting. We will be posting a list of tools, tips and tricks to help make your life a little easier. Our first pass will be addressing the Maximo Integration Framework (MIF).

Integration Framework

The Integration Framework (I-F) which is part of the TPAE platform (which means its features are available to both Maximo and SCCD), provides multiple capabilities to integrate data between Maximo and other (external) applications within and outside of an enterprise. This section of the Wiki will walk through various examples of how the I-F can be enabled for different integration scenarios.  Content will be added to this wiki on a continuous basis.
Continue reading

IBM Pulse: Invitation from IBM

We are getting excited for Pulse 2014! Here are some highlights of things on the horizon :

  • TUC Pulse Discount: As a member of the TUC, you now have access to a $400 discount to Pulse 2014! Use code PUL14TUC at registration to receive the discount. CLICK HERE to register for Pulse 2014.
  • Access the Pulse 2014 ROI Infographic HERE to see just how IBM Pulse 2014 will deliver. Did you know that all training, hands-on labs, networking, executive meetings, EXPO hours, and food & entertainment add up to a $7,000 value – more than 3x the conference rate of $2,095!
  • We’re are starting to plan our events happening in the TUC Lounge, so be on the look out in emails and social for our exciting announcements on giveaways, call for volunteers, fun games, and planning 1:1 meetings.
  • The most important announcement: We’re just having so much fun planning for Pulse 2014!
We look forward to seeing everyone at Pulse, and if you’re just as excited as we are, you can check out our Pulse 2014 page here in the TUC to be kept up to date on the latest news.